About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 15
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. mmy, bat, nuggets and all your favorite animated characters are auditioning, and you're the judge. so plug into pbskidsgo.org and play to decide who has what it takes. wait, wait, jess, don't leave. i'll help you out here. pull! (glass breaking) cut! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. worries about political gridlock, in italy and in washington, cause investors to dump stocks. it's the worst day for wall street since the november elections. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. with $85 billion in federal spending cuts just days away, we talk with congresswoman cathy mcmorris rodgers. >> susie: and the man who founded barnes and noble wants to buy his bookstores back, but he has no interest in the company's electronic book reader b&n's nook business. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: a sharp sell off on wall street today, as stocks suffered their biggest drop since november. italian and american politics put investors in
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
was patiently waiting while i introduced the guests at the table. can you tell us what the u.s. government doing is in this general area? >> perhaps a lot of people will remember that choicepoint had a type of breach and lexisnexis also did as well as lots of people. >> tell us about --. >> i could list the number of people but the bottom line is these breaches mean that people's personal identifiable information is made public and thieves could use it for predatory purposes. one thing that was not mentioned in the discussion i heard you folks talk about was credit cards. a lot of these credit cards are being -- the information is being sold to someone, he uses it for his own benefit, he or she, and lots of times it could be used for nef fairous purposes which goes to some of the concerns we have with the war on terrorism, a lot of people could take credit cards and use it to buy things -- before you stop it. now, near congress, we have a bill that passed out of my subcommittee called -- it's h.r. 4127, it's called the data accountability and trust act. i don't think most americans realize this
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
less an and the future of the church, we're joed by monsignor rick hilgartner of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. he's the executive director of the secretariat of divine worship. sister christine schenk, a catholic nun and executive director of future church, which calls for a more progressive church. and from rome, john allen of cnn. he covers the vatican for the network and for the "national catholic reporter." we thank you all three for being with us. john allen, i'm going to stay with you. how much of a surprise was this? >> judy, i think this was a near total shock. just to tell you how crazy it was, i was actually scheduled to have lunch with a senior vatican official, a guy who works ju down the hall from the papal apartment. as of early this morning even he didn't know it was coming. as your set-up piece indicated the shock isn't the content of the decision -- benedict had hinted fairly openly that he was receptive to the idea of a pope resigning, that actually under some circumstances a pope would have an obligation to resign if he's not able to continue to perform
. >> in the u.s. we've got to be able to enable long-term thinking. we've got to give institutions that are responsible the power to bring us to the next generation as opposed to tomorrow's conflicts or, you know, the conflict in a week. we've got to take what is ideaological and paralyzes us into the debatement but once somebody has power, let them lead at least for a period of time. if afterwards they get recalled by popular world so, be it. but you want a government whoever is elected to at least lead for a while so that you can progress. in europe you've got the same issues but multiplied because not only do you have it at the nation level, you have the whole construction of europe which is sort of like an unfinished building. >> where do you come down in terms of the question that europe faces and the united states faces which is there is debt. and you have to deal to debt. and but secondly, in order to create a sustainable level of trend, you have to have growth. and too much austerity inhibits growth, certainly in the short term. >> no question. so you have got to have, well
and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income taoury. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in deces. >> cau theyre locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in univers
, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first sentence of the 14th endment, great gift, the constitution gives a gift to peon my birthday, a birthday gift t makes me a citizen of the united states. >> because is with born here, no questions asked. and i think ever since, and i grew up as an immigrant kid, very much believing in america. my parents chose this place. they came here and i have been, i have this love affair with mark and its constitution and we have been trying ever since to repay the gift that it gave me. >> rose: when did you decide you wanted to be a cotitutionalcholar? >> thi in retrospect, you know, things seem obvious. but i think it was a process. i think there were three things that were key. when i was 10 years old my parents took me to see independence hall and the declaration of independence where it was drafted and the constitution. we went to the national archives. we went, hi lunch with my congressperson. and i visited mount vernon a
the reigns then had quite a long struggle. i think part of the whole reason that the u.s., i'm sort of an amateur student of the u.s. automobile industry. i think part of the reason that it ran into trouble was way before the 1970s. it was because the founders of those companies had relinquished the reign reins to businesspeople, not product people. >> rose: buzz as soon as you say that, i would make this observation. look what happened to ford. >> yes. >> rose: c.e.o. of ford. >> yes, yeah. >> rose: -- grew newspaper the car business, was not an engineer but was a superb manager. and grea sensibily for product. and i think-- . >> rose: yeah. >> and i think that's the element that gets missed a lot of the time. in these management turnovers. and particularly for technology company. you absolutely have to have as the guiding force of an abiding enduring technology company, a person or people at the helm who have products in their dna. >>os yeah. >> who love, who are crazed by the idea of making that thing better. >> better. >> the best. or making it better or the best or have this in
and the u.s. attorney community did? i think you have to take a step back. over the last couple of years, we have convicted raj rajaratnam. you'll say that's an insider trading case. but it's clearly going after wall street. >> smith: but it has nothing to do with the financial crisis, the meltdown, the packaging of bad mortgages that led to the collapse that led to the recession. >> well, first of all, i think that the financial crisis, martin, is multifaceted. and what we've had is a multipronged, multifaceted spon. and it's simply a fiction to say that where crimes were committed, we didn't pursue the cases. and that's why where crimes were committed, you have more people in jail today for securities fraud, bank fraud and the like than ever before. >> smith: but no wall street executives? >> no wall street executives. >> narrator: by september 2010, senator kaufman's term was nearing its end. before leaving, he held a second oversight hearing. >> criminals on wall street must be held to account. >> ted dided he wanted to have a second hearing before he left office so that he could questio
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)